An entertaining coincidence

About a month ago I managed to see the here in SF, and it was lovely. If you like that sort of thing, it’s the sort of thing you really like, etc.

As I exited through the gift shop I checked out the postcard rack, and was struck by this image of an Oscar de la Renta dress featured in Harper’s Bazaar in 1969:

I was struck not so much by the dress (which is lovely, of course), but by the fabric—it was the same as some Marc Jacobs fabric I’d bought a few years ago! (I blogged about a dress I made in a different colorway of this fabric back in 2015 here.) It’s silk/cotton, not organza:

You can tell better in this color image:

image from rarevintage.blogspot.com
image from

Or in this of another Oscar de la Renta piece in Vogue:

I think this is a jumpsuit?

It’s not uncommon for designers to revive print fabrics—most designers don’t create their own prints, but instead work with fabric houses to select fabrics for their collections. ( an interesting article about the process.) Some French and Italian print houses have been around for hundreds of years, and have catalogs going back pretty much forever.

It looks like this fabric was used in the Marc by Marc Jacobs line sometime before 2009; you can see a dress made with it :

image from FashionFuss.com
image from

Rashida Jones even wore something in this fabric in ! But I’ve only found one thing from the orange colorway—a .

I still haven’t made up this fabric, and probably the upshot of learning all this is that I will wait even longer to find the “perfect” pattern. (But I can tell you right now, it probably won’t have ruffles …)

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2 thoughts on “An entertaining coincidence

  1. and to think that Fashion 21 and Urban Outfitters get so much flack for producing and selling designer copies, when here you have shown a perfect example of a well known label (Marc Jacobs) doing the exact same thing with another designer’s (Oscar de la Renta) work. Even if the original was not recent, this isn’t cool IMO.

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