Looking Delightful

I got home from yesterday to find the above pattern waiting for me (I'd be posting a picture of the dress I made for said event if UNITED HADN'T LOST MY LUGGAGE, grrr*).

With any luck I can make this one up quickly, not just to replace the dress that may or may not be lost in the murky recesses of the Denver airport, but also to start laying in a store of warm dresses for winter. Even though I read in the news today that they're predicting a warmer-than-usual winter, and even though I'm sitting here in Chicago with the air-conditioning running in October (!), I still feel that one or two nice warm wool dresses might be handy to have around. January comes every year, y'know, and in Chicago, weird weather patterns aside, it's good to be prepared.

It need hardly be said that I am toying with the idea of running piping along that overbust seam, does it? I want a soft wool crepe in deep teal with cranberry piping, or vice-versa. (What I *really* want is a wool-cotton blend, Jubilee, but good luck finding that anywhere, anymore!)

And, just because, here's the description on the back of the pattern:

"It's a new you — looking delightful in the full-skirted casual. Cut-out neckline has soft gathers beneath the band. Below-elbow sleeves are cut-in-one with back bodice and band. Four-gore skirt has unpressed pleats."

How could you resist the promise of "looking delightful"? That's something that's just not on offer enough these days.

*Update: Luggage found! Or so they say.

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0 thoughts on “Looking Delightful

  1. Oh, Erin!I’m always on the lookout for long-sleeved vintage patterns. It seems that sundresses are much easier to find, but I can’t bear dresses without sleeves.Also, I’m glad the incompetent airline has found your luggage. That’s always a fright!

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  2. You are lucky they found your luggage so quickly. United lost my daughter’s luggage in Kansas City, when she was en route back to Univ. of Wyoming; it took them a week to find it and 3 more days to get it to Laramie.Fun dress! Delightful is good!

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  3. My, that is delightful! I imagine it took the edge off the missing luggage feeling. But we’ll look forward to the pic of the dress you wore when you get it back.Why ARE wool-cotton blend fabrics impossible to find? You can find wool-cotton yarn blends – though indeed they’re not common (and tend to pill, I believe).

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  4. Yes, looking delightful . . .in Chicago . . .in winter . . . the snow blowing sideways . . .the marrow chilling nicely in your bones . . . (My hometown, I LOVE LOVE LOVE it, and wouldn’t it be perfect to look delightful under those harsh weather circumstances? I can’t wait to see your incarnation of that dress. Please don’t delay in making it and sharing it with us!)

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  5. I love the idea of cranberry wool. I saw “persimmon” (an orange-y color) Scottish wool in a thrift store. I hope it is there when I get paid next week. I want to make McCall’s 5464 view D in it. I think my chances of getting said is I live in SC and people around here avoid wool like the plague around here…but I will make 3 wool dresses and wear them for those three cold days in January we get. I want to look delightful too! I love that pattern. I am glad they found your luggage and I hope you get it soon.

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  6. Oh, I LOVE the neckline!!! Great pattern!I’ve heard United is the worst airline for losing luggage, so congrats on them finding it. Hope it gets to you soon.

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  7. I love the older Butterick patterns that use words like Delighful and Charming to sell you the garment.. like the pictures alone aren’t lovely enough!

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  8. I hope everything works out with your luggage.I’m starting a new blog, BookWise and Loving It. I hope you’ll check it out.I don’t know if I ever commented about it, but I really enjoyed your interview about Google.

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  9. I love archaic adjectives like “delightful” and “splendid” and “magnificent”. Using those words makes me feel like a high society lady with crimped hair and opera glasses on a chain.

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  10. From my experience, Fashion Fabrics Club has the cheapest wool crepe (usually $10/yd, sometimes $8), but I can’t testify to its quality. Can anyone here?

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  11. Most of the dresses that you make have the sleeves cut with the bodice rather than being attached separately, don’t they? Is that because you like the look, or because it is hard to sew on sleeves (I am not a sewer, but I’d like to be one), or because most sleeved vintage dresses are built like that?

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  12. I agree with maddy, and “delightful” is one of my favorite words (not to mention one of the highest compliment I’ll pay to people and things). This dress certainly fits the bill. 🙂

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  13. I really like this dress. I have a similare vintage Vogue that I hope to make next month.Since I know that you are in Chicago, I’m glad you will be able to “make this one up quickly”, because even though we can hear the hum of our air conditioners kicking on and off right now, we know that can change in a matter of hours here. You know what they so, if you don’t like the weather in Chicago, just wait a few minutes.

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  14. Um, mini, that’s a bit of an advertisement, isn’t it?Is this really the appropriate place for that?(Erin, you may want to look into moderating that comment.)

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  15. Wow, I love everything about this dress! And I see we are the same size…which is killing me with longing (if only I was rich enough to pay you twice the private couture rate for private dressmaking!)Have (sob!) fun with it!

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  16. Erin, I would pay you SO MUCH for a copy of this pattern. I’m falling more and more in love with it.Woe that I did not find it first — and joy to she that did!

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  17. I am trying to imagine the pattern piece that includes, a one piece sleeve, front yoke and back bodice. Is it cut on a fold? I bought a piece of gray wool for a winter dress this week (not anything fancy at all) and the first thing I thought was, “This could use some piping around the armscyes and neck edge.”

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