quite possibly perfect

advance 6702

Okay, so I bought another pattern from ebay seller . I really couldn't resist this one … could you?

Every summer I end up making the same pattern three or four or five times … last year it was ; this year it may be this pattern. It just looks so perfect — the sweetheart neckline and the pockets are exactly right. I don't like the deep vee in the back but I can fix that easily by filling in the top and retracing the facing. This would be so easy to make, and even easier to wear. Throw a cardigan over it (I probably won't make the bolero) and it could go anywhere.

I have this lovely limp grass-green cotton open-weave that this will be stunning in, and some red floral, and some stripey pink seersucker, and maybe this will even be worth of the I bought in China. Heck, if it turns out to be The Pattern of Summer 2007 I might even use the green Chaiken cotton satin I bought ages ago and have never been able to bring myself to cut into.

So: prepare yourselves. If this goes well you'll be seeing a lot of it.

Advertisements

0 thoughts on “quite possibly perfect

  1. Love it! I was looking at something similar the other day. Great fabric choices. Please post photos of the finished products.

    Like

  2. I agree. This is The Perfect Dress. You have no reason to feel guilty over buying *more* patterns. Check out the 3 filing cabinet pattern files on my blog. One 5 drawer cabinet is devoted solely to our favorite attire.

    Like

  3. That’s a charmer.You could fill in the vee with a contrast fabric that matches the contrast fabric you’ll use for the bolero. (Right?)

    Like

  4. Have you seen McCalls 5431? A skirt with alot in it to love, IMO. Of course I already own it — I have only so much willpower. (And it was “all McCalls for $1.99” weekend, to boot.)

    Like

  5. Speaking of summer dresses reminds me of my recent struggles to make my teenaged daughter a sundress, which raises the whole mysterious (to me) issue of why off-the-rack clothes fit so much differently than sewing pattern clothes do. Both my daughter and I can easily find clothes off the rack that fit, but when I sew, especially for her, it’s another story. Pants are always too baggy (yes, I’ve experimented with sizes), and the baby-doll top I just tried to make for her was giant across the shoulders and way too baggy, even though I carefully made the size that corresponds to her measurements. I’ve tried tracing a ready-to-wear garment that she likes to make my own pattern, but distortion slid in despite my best efforts. I’ve been sewing all my life, and honestly, I am pretty good, but there are some things that I just won’t try any longer–pants and teenage styles chief among them. Is there some industry secret about how patterns get made for the sewing public? I’m serious; I hope one of your many adventurous readers can tell me! Thanks.

    Like

  6. Well Erin, you are lucky that you snagged that one. I checked out that seller from your link and I almost bought that pattern. Unfortunately it is not my size.Patricia

    Like

  7. Julia in Iowa,Somepatterns run bigger- Like Simplicity. I measure the pattern peices and sometimes have to cut it down or enlarge it. I hope that helps. I also pin, try one, re-pin, sew.

    Like

  8. Oh I just love it! Waists and sweetheart necklines and pockets are all bliss in my book. And I see we are the same size too. How I wish I could somehow get you to make one for me! Blackmail, bribery, entrapment…what’ll it take? 😉

    Like

  9. Oh come on! This may be a very nice pattern, but can’t you make at least one of the preceeding one, the Ann Adams? It’d be too bad to pass up on that one :-).

    Like

  10. Julia in Iowa, Many of us covet vintage patterns because *generally* they are drafted better than what is being offered today. My theory is the newer CAD patterns must be using aliens as models while the older hand drafted patterns used real humans. 🙂 Try New Look ($3.44 at Walmart)and check the finished measurements of the GARMENT, not the size that it’s supposed to fit. Some patterns have huge amounts of ease factored in. I sew for my 19 and 21 yo daughters and they fit well into The Limited brand. I buy this brand of pants at the thrift store for 99 cents, take them apart and use them as a pattern. Now they have pants that fit like off the rack and a 34″ inseam for their long legs. This is much easier than trying to trace off and get the darts right. You can do this with any garment, and for a buck it can be in an ugly fabric cuz it’s the style you’re after.

    Like

  11. Julia in Iowa, if the patterns you are making up for your daughter are large, especially in the shoulder area, my guess is that she’s small-boned and bosomy. In fact, if the pants are large as well, I suspect she may be a small-boned, hourglass-shaped girl. What size bra cup does she wear? If she is larger than a B-Cup, regardless of her band (bra) size, and you are buying patterns by her bust measurement, there is no way that the garment you make will fit her. All commercial patterns are sized for B-Cups. If she is a C-Cup or larger, and you buy the pattern by the number of inches around her bust, the garment will be miles too big around the neck and shoulders. And back. And waist. And too long-waisted for her, as well. If she’s larger than a B-Cup, you need to take her high bust measure, under her arms and around her chest, ABOVE her bustline. Then you buy the pattern as if that was her actual bust measure. Example: I wear a 36D bra. If I went by the bust measurement, I would be buying a pattern by a 40″ measurement – sometimes a 41″ measurement. Instead, I measure my high bust/chest, and it comes out to a 36″ measurement if I flex, and a 34″ measurement if I don’t flex. That means despite the 40/41″ bust measurement, I buy a size 12 (for a 34″ bust), MAYBE a size 14 (for a 36″ bust) pattern, and make alterations. Yes, I buy a size 12 pattern, still, sometimes, even though my hips also measure in at 40/41″. Yes, I have to make bunches of really strange alterations to my patterns to get them to fit – but not as many as I would if I were buying patterns for a 40/41″ bust! From what I’ve seen, most of the time, people wind up buying patterns that are TOO BIG. If you find that, regardless of the style type, pants are too baggy and the shoulders swim, the patterns are too big – and you need to keep experimenting with the sizes. Quite often, if it’s a loosely-fitted pattern, or a very loosely-fitted pattern, she should go down one size from whatever is ultimately determined to be her usual size. If you don’t mind posting your daughter’s measurements – bust, chest, bra size, waist, high hip and low hip and crotch depth, AND her height, I’ll take a guesstimate at the size she should be trying. For entertainment value, post what she wears off the rack, because it’s a departure point for the guestimate. Often, adding the number “6” to her ready-to-wear size will bring you close to her modern pattern size. That is, if she wears a fitted size 6 jacket or dress, she should start with a size 12 pattern. If she wears a fitted size 4 jacket, she should start with a size 10 pattern. If she wears a size 2, she should start with a size 8 pattern, but you’ll probably have to alter a 10, unless you find patterns in the 6-8-10 grouping, which would be really handy if she’s an off-the-rack size 0, because that will translate to a size 6 pattern, which isn’t always easy to find. If she is a petite, either in her tops or her bottoms, that’s another alteration that needs to be made to each pattern she buys – and it is possible to be a petite in one part (top) and not the other (bottom) (or petite bottom, average top). It depends on where she carries her height in her body. But I can pretty well guarantee that at least one of the things causing your fitting difficulties with her is that the patterns are just too big for her.

    Like

  12. Julia, you and your dtr. are lucky to find RTW that fits off the rack. I am never so lucky, which is one of the reasons I sew. I read somewhere once that RTW is really NOT Ready to wear, that it usually needs some kind of alteration. That was the original intent, all those years ago when it arrived on the scene. Now only menswear and wedding dresses have the seam allowances for alterations. I agree w/ the advice to check the finished garment measurements; if you compare these w/ the body measurements + basic ease, then you will know what kind of ease is designed for the garment: this is much more reliable than looking at the illustration or even photo as both are manipulated to show off the design and sell it. What follows is my short treatise on pattern sizing, for what its worth. Could be TMI. Read at your own risk. Pattern sizing used to be pretty straight-forward and it was the only standardized sizing in the clothing industry. The Big 4 pattern companies last revised this standard sizing in 1972, to reflect RTW and catalog sizing. RTW was supposedly based on a size 12 at that time and graded up or down from there: we know thats hardly true now. The savvy shopper finds a RTW brand that suits her body type (and she hopes, her style and budget) and she has found a brand with a fit model who could be her twin. (The same holds true for most, but not all independent pattern companies: look at the designer/owner and you have a pretty true image of the fit model for the pattern line.)In the last 5-10 years, dissatisfaction w/ fit began to foment at the grass roots level: fit classes proliferated, then books by independent teachers on the national circuit came out and were snapped up (so more were written), more and more women signed up for classes to get help in fitting, and the cycle continued, because learning fit is a process. At some point in this process, the Big 4 noticed and threw us a few crumbs: Palmer- Pletsch classic patterns with fit tips and a few patterns with adjustments for over-B cup bodices (who knew before then that all patterns were made for a B-cup?). The big breakthrough was a line of patterns designed by Sandra Betzina for Vogue and Butterick for women of a certain age with new sizing and letters, not numbers for each size. My mantra for students: B-cup and under, buy patterns by your full bust measurement; over a B-cup, use your high bust measurement, now had an addendum: except for Sandra Betzinas patterns. Check the catalog for how to buy her patterns; instructions are printed in the catalog. And the hardest lesson of all was that whatever your RTW size, your pattern size would likely be larger. Ouch! That was a hard one to swallow, even though most women in classes just wanted to have clothes that fit. Explanations about RTW vanity sizing and the total lack of standard sizing made me blue in the face, but couldnt ease the shock of that huge size pattern required. Recently Connie Crawford has put out a line of patterns for Butterick with sizing based on RTW! I took a class from her that was hands down the best fit class I have ever taken (she debunked the high bust practice and said its easy to alter shoulders). I understand why she chose the sizing she did, I think, but I wish she hadnt done it! I bought two of her patterns; havent made them yet. The guide sheets show how to do a FBA on a princess seam, but not for any other design. She does show how to adjust for a chunky or thin bicep, which many plus size patterns do not. Her size range is XS (3/4) to 6X (42/44W). I plan to email her and ask if the cup size is a B.Anyway, the moral of the story is that it has become much more complicated to find the right size in a pattern than it used to be, but there are a few more options for patterns that may fit well w/o a lot of work. I have found out the hard way that it is well worth my time to trace my pattern on exam table paper, save the original for reference, then make a muslin out of muslin that I can mark, cut and tape, and finally make a new pattern from the corrected muslin, testing that in muslin if necessary. Some people are very happy with pin-fitting the pattern: go for if that works for you; it makes me crazy!Happy sewing!

    Like

  13. forgot to mention Hot Patterns for McCalls which have new sizing, too, which might work better for Julia’s dtr., plus they are young styles. Check out sites that review patterns for more help and advice.Erin, you are lucky to have the body for these darling vintage styles that you post. I sigh for those long-lost days!fabulous dress: patterns LOVE company, don’t ya know??

    Like

  14. I enjoyed reading LaBellaDonna’s and Saidee’s advice. Labelladonna has helped me before. Using the ready wear +6 formula works for me…I’m a double D cup and long waisted. I also have a broad back and shoulders, so that is probably why I don’t have to make any alterations. I was also relieved to know that my two forays into sewing pants that turned into dismal failures – not my fault — wrong size pattern!

    Like

  15. But I want to know, what ever became of that other Advance dress pattern – the perfect one with the kimono sleeves and midriff band? (I’ve been stalking the vintage pattern sites to see if THAT one ever shows up again. Love it.) Still, THIS is a very gorgeous dress and can’t wait to see what you do with the pockets. (And emjay, agree with you on that McCalls skirt! Skirts are my new venture, now that I can approximately sew zippers. They have a great wrap skirt with pockets, too. Can’t wait until the next $1.99 sale!)

    Like

  16. Erin, I wonder if we’ve done enough to deserve this yet; I also took a picture of The World’s Scariest Mannequin, which must have been purchased at the fire sale of the Nazi Uniform Supply Company, but I didn’t upload it. Maybe later if you’re all very very good.Apologies if you’ve posted already.I love your blog!

    Like

  17. If only I could sew!!!! Please show us some of your dresses that you have sewn from vintage patterns. I would love to see them!

    Like

  18. being a much much larger cup size than B, I always end up making my own patterns anyway, starting with one that is much too large but claims to fit my bust and hip measurements, or taking apart other clothes that fit (not likely in ready to wear clothing) and using them to make a pattern. Perhaps I should try the above advice, and get a smaller pattern to begin with, but isn’t it easier to work with a muslin copy that is too big rather than too small? I wouldn’t know where to begin my alterations if I couldn’t fit the item over my chest/hips to try it on!

    Like

  19. Thanks for the reflections on my questions. My daughter wears a B cup, as do I, and I do select the measurements rather than the size, so I’m still baffled. But I’ll try some of the pattern lines you mentioned and see if there’s a difference. I wondered about taking apart clothes that fit and using them as patterns, but thought the pieces might be distorted from wear. However, it’s probably worth a try.

    Like

  20. Julia in Iowa, it’s OK if your clothes are distorted from wear; it means that they’ve distorted to fit you. I would suggest, rather than taking apart your RTW clothes, lay them out flat, and superimpose patterns that you already own right on top of them. It’s most helpful if they’re similar types – raglan sleeves over raglan sleeves, jewel necks, etc., but mostly you’re looking to see where the patterns are too big. It is possible, even though you are B-cups (IF you’re wearing the right bra size), you’re still a size or two too large. What are your ready-to-wear sizes?But remember, lay a pant leg pattern over a favorite (yes, stretched-out!) pair of pants, and do the same with dresses and blouses. It may be that the designer just includes way more ease than you want or need.

    Like

  21. “You’re still a size or two too large” = “You’re still BUYING PATTERNS a size or two too large for you, what with design ease and wearing ease.” Yeesh!

    Like

  22. Stacy, you make the muslin AFTER making the alterations you need for your full bust (FBA) and other fit issues. It will then be pretty close to fitting you, and the changes to the muslin will be mostly fine-tuning. You might need to slash the muslin and insert paper or fabric for more room, or slash and overlap if it’s too big: I use masking tape to do this, or pins if I can. You could start with a too-big pattern, but that is too much work and you’d have to alter everywhere. It is best to get as close as you can with your paper pattern, than make your muslin.When your are learning to fit, sometimes you have to make more than one muslin, but it’s worth it. Some people start with sort of classic patterns that can be changed/embellished/look really different in different fabrics or w/ diff. sleeve, neckline, hem lengths so they can get the most out of one or two patterns that they know fit. Once the process becomes easier, then you will not hesitate to alter any pattern.I have several books on fit and each one has something to offer. I read EVERY article on fit that I see in magazines, as learning to fit is an on-going process. I recommend finding a fit buddy, since it is almost impossible to do a good job of fitting yourself. You learn a lot fitting someone else, even if her body has different issues.Good Luck!

    Like

Leave a Reply