A masochist is someone who

… despite really only liking to make full-skirted dresses (and abhors sewing gores or tiers) continues to browse kimono fabric online. Did I mention that kimono fabric is FIFTEEN INCHES WIDE? No? Well, it is. At best. But look at these!

I either need to find a pattern that calls for ten yards of fifteen-inch-wide fabric (and don't be cute and say, brightly, "why not a kimono?" you wiseacres), rethink my aversion to gored and tiered skirts, or stop checking that website.

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0 thoughts on “A masochist is someone who

  1. Erin, I’ve read about these fabrics on the sewretro yahoogroups, but I’ve never seen any images of them. Now that I’ve ACTUALLY seen kimono fabric, I just want to go and buy at least one roll, which would be enough to cover either my bottom or top half, but not both….

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  2. oh nooooo! Like I need to hoard more fabric. That second one is gorgeous. And the green one…I’m a little bit scared to go to the website. Thanks for posting this!

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  3. Hey, the kimono sleeve was quite popular on vintage dresses and in honor of the fabric it would seem fitting to keep that feature. Remember that vintage fabric was usually 36″ wide so it would have been pieced to get those full circle skirts. You probably have the Madeline Vionnet book where the fabric is pieced (straight seams) before it’s cut on the bias. In fact, the pattern you posted a few days ago would be awesome in kimono fabric!

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  4. Fabric stores in Japan are like precious little jewelry shops-don’t go in and think you can “handle” the material like I did…Kimono shops are the best! There are hundreds of rolls of silk and scads of accessories-belts, obis, purses. Textile arts in Japan are truly amazing.

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  5. Every time I hear the word Kimono, it reminds me of “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”…besides that, I loved the top fabric pattern. the colours are beautiful.

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  6. I was leafing through the latest “Lucky” in the airport today, and saw a two-page spread of Duro-esque dresses!! Thought of you.

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  7. Mmm…I have to say thank you for the links. I loved the second one so much that I bought it, as well as two other bolts.As for patterns that use 15″ wide fabrics, I think this might work () I’ve seen it made up in several different fabrics, and it’s gorgeous. This skirt is also quite lovely, and would probably lend itself nicely to narrower fabrics (.)

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  8. There is also a phamphlet that I believe is published by Royal Ontario Museum titled “Cut my Cote”.It has patterns for many pieces of clothing based on narrow-woven fabric.

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  9. If you buy fabric from Africa (as in artisan fabric) it’ll often be very narrow too. (Random fact of the day.)Anyway, what in the name of bumwipes is a gored and tiered skirt? Once again I admit my ignorance.

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  10. Wonderful fabrics. I clicked through to the website and saw an absolutely beautiful bolt of wool kimono fabric. It had already been sold, however. Sigh.Amy

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  11. To bani…a gore is an extra piece of fabric spliced vertically into a skirt. They are usually narrow on top and wide at the bottom, so as to add a bigger flare to a skirt. tier is a horizontal row of fabric (as in a gypsy skirt) gathered and sewn to a waistband. They can be narrow or wide much like the tiers on a wedding cake.

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  12. Thank you very much, lady Arwen. I know I should google this, but I get such good explanations by just asking… Thanks! So a gore is sort of like a huge dart then? See, I would have called that a dart, so I’m grateful for the info!

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  13. Well, technically a dart removes fabric, making something tighter where as a gore adds fabric making something bigger. A tier is like a wedding cake and a gore is like a slice of pie. Anyone up for dessert?

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  14. Oh my! I love the modern ones, the last two….. Oh dear! How about capris – cut one piece at a time, single thickness? Might make it for smaller sizes. Larger sizes could piece a strip down the sides, or add a gore to the crotch area. Oh dear…. What great fabric!

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