Do you know what day it is?

It's Leg Liberation Day. Today is day where I begin wearing skirts every day. I mean, I wear skirts most of the time, but after about mid-April, or as soon as I can see my way clear to a few weeks of sixty-degree temperatures, the pants all disappear (the few pairs that I did wear) and it's nothing but skirts from now until late September or even early October (depending on the tights sitch).

This is a new skirt pattern I'm going to try soon — I like the contour waistband, it's very wearable and easily adjustable for those who like their skirts to ride higher or lower — and I'm looking forward to it immensely. I have all sorts of fabric ideas for this pattern … too many even to list!

Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go dig up all my peds, too, because Leg Liberation Day is also Jack Purcells Day (Observed), where I start wearing all my pairs of Jack Purcell sneakers again with the now-bare legs …

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0 thoughts on “Do you know what day it is?

  1. I bought this same pattern a couple of months ago, also in anticipation of bare legs. I have not made it yet so I will look forward to you blogging about it, if you beat me to it. I don’t have any fabric that I can think of at home so I would have to go buy some. Are you thinking cotton?

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  2. The forecast on accuweather.com for today said – no kidding – “Mostly sunny and delightful.” I took that as a cue to start wearing my summer skirts. Looks like we’ve got the same m.o.!

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  3. Amen. I was shopping yesterday and looking at pants for work, when I thought, “What the point of buying pants? Soon, I’m just going to wear skirts all the time anyway.” Though my leg liberation day is still about a month away.

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  4. Leg liberation seems a long way off. In the UK its sideways rain and howling wind. Still in thick black tights and knee high boots! Enjoy spring, I’ll let you know if it gets here…

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  5. That is indeed a very nice skirt, although I loathe the variant with the belly ruching. But the basic skirt is charming.If I made it, I’d probably either lengthen it or (likelier) add a flounce to bring it down to mid-calf. I love long skirts.

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  6. I’m afraid I don’t know anything about the arch support in Jack Purcells — I have high arches and they don’t bother me.I fixed the picture for all you Firefox haters.

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  7. Dress A Day reader Sharon and I spent some quality time at P&S Fabrics two Sundays ago gathering materials for a skirt-making lesson. We narrowed our pattern search down to this and another NewLook; I think we ended up choosing the other one, but it was a tough call.

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  8. I love the idea of a Sew-Along! I think they do them at Pattern Review, too. And Julia, I’m thinking cottons … lots and lots and lots of cottons.

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  9. I like to think of what Erin calls “Leg Liberation Day” as “Winter Pant Retirement Day.” I was wearing my lined wool pants today (insane! I know!!!), and it hit me. No more wool pants! It’s spring for heaven’s sake!My staple A-line skirt pattern is a slightly modified version of McCall’s 3999 (which has disappeared from the face of the internet, apparently). I just got a swatch of the most gorgeous pink linen blend that I’m starting this Saturday. Long live spring skirts.

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  10. Count me in for the sew-along! It would be good incentive to actually complete a project. Then we can all share photos of the fruits of our labors! (That is, if they actually turn out the way we hoped they would…)The thing I love most about this pattern is the waistband. I love a wider waistband; but I always feel like a skirt with an actual yoke on it makes my tummy look even more pronounced than it already does! This is a nice, happy medium.

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  11. Lucky you! It’s snowing here in Switzerland! I will have to wait for my personal leg-liberation-day 😉 So have fun with your skirts, I envy you.

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  12. My tummy is my trouble spot, love skirts, trouble finding styles. Any tips ladies? I have a vintage print that looks like fashion magazine covers in black, lime, white and pink! I see those sequined, pleated, border print skirts everywear….. but pleats over my stomach????

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  13. Hmmm. I made it through the entire Eastern Seaboard winter wearing bifurcated garments only for gym. Still, I’m happy to celebrate Leg Liberation Day on behalf of my sisters! And sew-along is never dorky! (Although sometimes it IS recorded electronically by the government, if you’re doing sew-by-phone with a friend.) For Anonymous with the tummy concerns: This is actually a good pattern for you, although you may want to experiment; you may want to narrow, or even eliminate, the waistband, and you definitely want the top untucked. Please note that tops, especially knit ones, should not come all the way down to the base of the tummy, where they can cling lovingly to the bottom of the tum and define the entire area. They should, instead, stop about 1/4 to 1/3 of the way down the area (hem store-bought tops to this length), which will actually help this area appear flatter. (So tops should be longer than waist-, but shorter than hip-length.)Of course, the version you want is the UNPLEATED version. No pleats over that tummy! That A-line on the bias should hang straight down off the tummy, creating the illusion that the area is flat.The easiest, bestest skirt for someone with a tummy (and it works if you have large hips or narrow hips, but it’s even better for large hips): Cut a half-circle of fabric (it’s easiest to start with 2 1/2 yards of 45″ fabric). Take your 2 1/2 yard rectangle and fold it into a square. The back zipper will be set into the selvedge edge; the fold is the area which will hang down over the tummy when the skirt is worn. Take a tapemeasure and pin it in the corner where it’s folded (right where the selvedge is folded). This will be the waist of the skirt. Measure down the selvedge approximately 1/3 of your waist measurement. Make a mark (the Waist Mark). Mark an arc from the selvedge to the fold (the Waist Mark Arc) (best to mark every inch and then connect-the-dots to make the arc). Now measure down along the selvedge from the top of the Waist Mark Arc to Your Favorite Skirt Length, plus a couple of inches for safety’s sake. Doesn’t matter if it’s 26 inches or 40 inches. Make another mark (the Skirt Length Hem Mark). Pin that tape measure back up in the corner fold, and where you made your Skirt Length Hem Mark (which should be 1/3 Your Waist Length + Your Favorite Skirt Length + Couple Of Safety Inches), swing that tape measure from the selvedge side to the fold, marking every couple of inches and joining the marks (connect-the-dot fashion) into an arc (the Skirt Length Hem Arc). Keeping the fabric folded, cut along the Waist Mark Arc, and the Skirt Length Hem Arc. You should have a half circle shape of fabric with a half circle cut out at the top, along the selvedge, for the waist, with plenty of fabric left for cutting Your Favorite Width Waistband. You should even be able to cut the waistband with one side on the selvedge so it doesn’t need to be finished along that side! Put in a zipper, put on the waistband, add a hook and eye, put in a narrow hem AFTER you’ve let the skirt hang a couple of days, and have marked the hem off on yourself.Be conservative cutting out the waist circle; you can make it larger by cutting it down in increments. The skirt will stretch most where it’s bias, and the back seam won’t stretch at all. Of course, if you make the waist a little too big, just use an elastic the right length, instead of interfacing, in the waistband. Then you’ll have a waistband that expands with you.It’s one of the most flattering skirt shapes possible, and it’s easier to make than describe. (You can take two squares of toilet paper, fold it down to one square, and try the technique out; you’ll see!)And of course, there are variations possible, with handkerchief hems and ruffles. If there was ever a candidate for making over and over, especially for summer skirts, it’s this one!

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  14. Thanks, my favorite way to sew-no pattern! I doesn’t sound complicated at all! I can’t wait to try it!!!! Shaving my legs for the “Skirts of Spring” well, that’s another story…! haha

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  15. I got to JoAnns today and picked up this pattern. And some black embroidered cotton for it.My Joann’s is poo, but I did what I could.

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  16. Speaking of shaving…Erin, what are your feelings on pantyhose (nylons) and tights? Is Leg Liberation Day also Leg-Wear Shelving Day?I love going bare-legged, but I absolutely hate shaving. Yarrrrrrrr!

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  17. I think it’s entirely possible to go bare-legged all year round, including in the depths of winter. The trick is to liberate your legs in the middle of summer when there’s no hardship involved, then stay with the program as the weather changes. That way, although there will be days when you feel a little chilly, there will never be a time when it feels totally unbearable. And before you know where you are it’s spring again… 🙂

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  18. I live in the cold Northeast,For years ago, I always was wearing pantyhose, but for the last 7 years, I havn’t worn any hosiery; pantyhose, stockings or socks, my legs are bare 12 months a year. Down to 30 degrees i wear skirts with bare legs in leather-pumps or leather dressboots, below 30 de-grees i wear jeans or boot-skirt, and keep my bare feet toasty in furlined boots, and as a true fashionista, it is always bare legs with strappy sandals for evening and formal. Bare legs looks and feels good and it is very healthy for your circulation to go barelegged all the time. when the temperature passes 50 degrees, it start to be time to get the strappy sandals out, and show my perfect kept, bare, polish-free toe-nails. When you have nice finger- and toe nails, you should never wear any nail polish, bare natural nails looks elegant, and is a perfect match for the trendi sans-makeup with nude lips look.So ladies; do as I have done – trow all your old pantyhoses, stockings, thights and socks in the trash and enjoy the elegance and comfort of bare legs 365 days a year – even when it is snowing.

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